• The 1980s: Vittorio Storaro & Technicolor

    As the 1980s approached, Technicolor faced an increasing challenge from other film labs that were now competing on a playing field that no longer included the company’s IB dye-transfer offering.  That degree of differentiation between Technicolor and its competition was removed, but again, as it had many times before, the company turned to its legacy of innovation and color-science to manage to forge another crossroads of change.  That process included dramatically growing its home entertainment business for VHS tape-replication of studio films.  With new state-of-the-art high-speed printers to keep pace with the greatly expanded international demand of Hollywood films, it also dramatically grew its global film-print capability.

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  • The 1970s: The Decade of a Generational Shift

    American filmmaking in the 1970s is fondly remembered as being one of the most creative decades in motion picture history.  Talent, industry trends, and personalities converged in that decade to change the shape of filmmaking forever.  Meanwhile, Technicolor played a major role in the industry’s evolution at that time through its ability to reinvent itself, while at the same time, supporting those creative visionaries that took over the industry…filmmakers like Francis Coppola, Warren Beatty, Martin Scorsese, Clint Eastwood, Steven Spielberg, and George Lucas.

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  • The 60s & Technicolor

    One remembers the 1960s as a decade in motion picture history that witnessed a huge generational shift. Hollywood began to experience the breakdown of the traditional studio structure, with power shifting to actors and directors, along with their agents, thereby breaking free of long-term employment contracts that severely limited their mobility and power of self determination – a major theme of the overall cultural shift that quickly enveloped that turbulent decade.  The evolution of motion pictures in the 1960s is also clearly reflected in Technicolor’s legacy of re-invention…a core value of the corporation throughout its illustrious century-long history.

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  • Summer In Glorious Technicolor

    Technicolor is a transcendent name in the history of cinema.  The name, Technicolor, derived by Dr. Herbert Kalmus and his early partners, from conjoining “technique” and “color” is something so embedded into global vernacular as to be, at the same time, a noun, an adjective and an adverb.  The experience of Technicolor films is universally shared because of the power of cinema and the fundamental emotional connection audiences make to color – especially when employed by so many of the world’s greatest filmmakers.  And Technicolor is globally celebrated as witnessed by so many wonderfully related events around the world to date in 2015 – and continuing for the rest of the year.  This summer is no exception, with wonderful tributes taking place in New York and Toronto.  What began at the George Eastman House, in Rochester, continues to play out in this “summer of Technicolor.”

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  • 48 Hours In Technicolor

    On July 7th and 8th, Turner Classics Movies will present 25 classic films in glorious Technicolor.  The Technicolor series of vintage films will be introduced by TCM’s Robert Osborne, with award-winning cinematographer Caleb Deschanel, ASC.  The selection of films is derived from early Technicolor films, from the silent, 2-color era of Technicolor, like The Toll of the Sea that ranged from the early 1920’s until the introduction of sound in 1927.

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